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Vinaceous Wines

Showcasing Australia’s finest wine regions.
The Vinaceous Wines story began in 2007 by visionaries Nick Stacy and Mike Kerrigan as the new movement of contemporary Australian wine producers emerged.  Drawing on some 50 years combined industry experience their vision was to create a unique Australian wine company that hand selected the best regional Australian vineyards and pockets of fruit, crafting varietals we love, and showcasing Australia’s finest wine regions for what they are truly capable of. Some of the selected vineyards that caught the eye of Nick and Mike were the famous Australian wine regions of Margaret River, Adelaide Hills,
and McLaren Vale.

Vinaceous has their full range of Wines to buy directly online

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Some of our White Australian Wines

Vinaceous Wines were among the first Australian wine produces to release West Australian Vermentino. A wine with zippy acidity and bright and fresh citrus and spice aromas. This wine will unshamingly transport you into an Italian wonderland and is ideally matched with seafood.

Another West Australian wine that pairs well with seafood is the Divine Light Sauvignon Blanc. With the grapes being blended from two vineyards, Vinaceous achieved subtle and delicate aromas with striking fruit flavors, leaving you feeling refreshed.

Moving east, we find the Vinaceous Sirenya Pinot Grigio. Similar to the Vermentino and the SB, the Sirenya is bright, fresh and aromatic with sweet nashi pears and delicious floral aromas. Once again, this delightful Australian wine goes perfectly with seafood on a lovely sun-drenched summers day.

Another wine demonstrating the reason why the south-west region of Margaret River is setting such a fabulous benchmark for Chardonnay is the Vinaceous Shakre. Bright, cleaning and slightly more aromatic than usual, the rich fruit flavors coupled with the subtlest of oak, leave your pallet spotless with the classic fruit and citrus notes of this Chardonnay.

Some of our Red Australian Wines

Starting with one of our most popular wines, the 2015 Red Right Hand Shiraz Grenache Tempranillo displays not only an awesome colour of a deep and dark crimson red but comes with a delightful bouquet of mixed berries and savory aromas. A full, rich yet textural finish to a delightful red.

Sourced from the old vine in the heart of South Australia’s McLaren Vale, the Snake Charmer Shiraz is hand harvested and made using tried and tested techniques. The deep purple colour and intense black fruit perfumes coupled with dark chocolate and mocha notes across the palate come from the Shiraz being matured in Frech & American oak. A perfect Australian wine to accompany char-grilled meats and American style BBQ’s.

Returning back to the Margaret River wine region, the 2015 Vinaceous Raconteur Cabernet Sauvignon portrays the classic cabernet from the region. Rich, lush and deep purple colours are fantastic on the eye and the black berry and mochal notes are even better on the nose. Again, another fantastic Australian wine to couple with a great chargrilled selection of meat.

The Voodoo Moon Malbec was expertly blended by Michael Kerrigan and Nick Stacy, giving it a dark and purple colour with a perfumed bouquet. This wine is perfect for lovers of a rich palate that really fills the mouth with intense weight but retains it’s subtleties with soft integrated tannins. A perfect match for mature cheeses and roast meats.

 

Australian Wine Production

While Australian wine production has dwindled to about 4% today, she still remains the 4th largest exporter (by volume) in the world, behind the wine-producing might of Italy, France and Spain. By the end of 2010, with vine-bearing area of about 160,000 hectares and over 2,000 wine producers consuming about 1,6 million tonnes of grapes, 781 million liters of Australian wine was exported.


A Brief History of Australian Wine

The First Fleet arrived on the shores of Australia with never seen before vines from the Cape of Good Hope and Brazil in 1788. Being of a different clime, these first vines were damaged in the humidity and heat of Australia, and the first planting attempt at Sydney Cove failed.

Stepping into Viticulture in 1825, James Busby would go on to embark on a vine collection voyage around Europe in 1831, a journey that remains etched in the history of Australian wine. He would collect over 650 vine varieties.

Of these, only about 362 vine varieties survived, and they were planted in Sydney’s botanical gardens, while Busby had a duplicate collection planted at his property in Hunter Valley. Cuttings from this collection would later be found in various parts of South Australia, NSW, and Victoria. This original Busby collection gave birth to most Australian old vines.

The Wyndham Estate was established in 1828, making the Hunter Valley the first commercial vineyard region. 1850 saw the emergence of more commercial vineyards in different Australian states, most largely productive. Early winegrowers, from the Mornington Peninsula’s Maritime Slopes, to the South Australian’s Barossa Valley, and up north to Sydney’s Hunter Valley, all embraced the varying conditions of the massive Australian landscape.

The United Kingdom would get her first import of over 6,291 liters (1,384 gallons) of Australian wine in 1854.

1870 brought a massive wave of phylloxera infection which affected some Australian states. While a few phylloxera active pockets remain in some areas, most areas are phylloxera free in Australia, and boast of age-old, superior ungrafted vines.

 

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